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Frontage Types and the Public Realm
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Frontage Types and the Public Realm

Frontage Types and the Public Realm

73 min
Credit: AICP CMCNU-A

This course is approved for 1.25 AICP CM credits

Frontage types, described as the space and elements between building façades and the street, are a very important component of the physical environment—from the smallest towns to the largest cities. Frontage types are not about architectural style, but about how individual buildings connect to an appealing public realm. Without good frontages, a streetscape will be poorly shaped and visually unappealing. This course will teach you the 10 primary frontage types and their features and distinctions. In addition, this course will show how to apply frontage types to buildings in response to existing or intended physical character. By the end of this course, you will have a high understanding of the range of frontage choices, their importance, and how to apply them to achieve community objectives.

In This Course

  1. Tony Perez introduces the course.
  2. What is Frontage?
    Simply put: some streets are appealing and some are less so. The question is, how much does frontage contribute to an appealing streetscape?
  3. Least Urban Frontage Types
    This chapter addresses the lower end of the frontage spectrum, focusing on the least urban types and their appropriate physical contexts.
  4. Most Urban Frontage Types
    This chapter addresses the higher end of the frontage spectrum, focusing on the most urban types and their appropriate physical contexts.
  5. Using Frontage Types to Articulate Physical Character
    This chapter shows how to use frontage types to fill in gaps along streetscapes or to make entirely new blocks. Each type contributes to an existing or intended physical character. This chapter also shows how to allocate the range of types across different zones.
  6. Regulating Frontage Types to Articulate Physical Character
    This chapter shows how to regulate frontage types to generate and support an existing or intended physical character.

Published 2016